SNAP (Food Stamps) and Earned Income Tax Credit Had Big Antipoverty Impact in 2011

September 12, 2012 at 4:34 pm

The official poverty figures count only cash income, so they don’t reflect the antipoverty impact of some key safety net programs, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and SNAP (formerly food stamps).  But the Census data released this morning show that if you count these benefits, the EITC lifted 5.7 million people — including 3 million children — out of poverty in 2011, and SNAP lifted out 3.9 million people, including 1.7 million children.

See our statement for more details.

Print Friendly

More About Arloc Sherman

Arloc Sherman

Sherman is a Senior Researcher focusing on family income trends, income support policies, and the causes and consequences of poverty.

Full bio | Blog Archive | Research archive at CBPP.org

1 Comments Add Yours ↓

Comments are listed in reverse chronological order.

  1. Francis Ferguson Ph.D.(economics) #
    1

    While the effects of anti-poverty measures are important, and lift significant numbers of people who are at or below the official poverty income level to a position above the cutoff, it is still relevant to know how many people this economic system relates to poverty in absence of corrective measures. This latter figure reflects the actual results of the current economy. The post-ameliorative number reflect how much off-setting good the government can achieve.



Your Comment

Comment Policy:

Thank you for joining the conversation about important policy issues. Comments are limited to 1,500 characters and are subject to approval and moderation. We reserve the right to remove comments that:

  • are injurious, defamatory, profane, off-topic or inappropriate;
  • contain personal attacks or racist, sexist, homophobic, or other slurs;
  • solicit and/or advertise for personal blogs and websites or to sell products or services;
  • may infringe the copyright or intellectual property rights of others or other applicable laws or regulations; or
  • are otherwise inconsistent with the goals of this blog.

Posted comments do not necessarily represent the views of the CBPP and do not constitute official endorsement by CBPP. Please note that comments will be approved during the Center's business hours. If you have questions, please contact communications@cbpp.org.




five − 1 =

 characters available