Latest Census Data Strengthen Case for Helping Childless Workers

September 23, 2014 at 5:10 pm

Poverty and incomes worsened last year for childless adults while improving for children and their families, the new Census data show.  The new figures highlight the need to do more to help low-income workers not raising minor children, as both President Obama and House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, among others, have proposed.

  • The poverty rate for individuals not living in families (primarily people living alone and unrelated people who share a household) rose to 23.3 percent in 2013, the highest in over 30 years. 
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Last Year’s Drop in Poverty Only the Second Since 2000

September 22, 2014 at 4:43 pm

The decline in the official poverty rate last year from 15.0 percent to 14.5 percent is especially welcome because it follows a decade and a half of mostly rising or stagnant poverty rates, our detailed look at the new Census figures explains.  Before 2013, the official poverty rate fell only once since 2000 (see chart).  Still, at the current rate of progress — which was hampered in 2013 by slow job growth and austerity policies — poverty won’t return to its pre-recession level of 12.5 percent until about 2017.… Read more

Census Data Show Improved Health Coverage in 2013

September 22, 2014 at 4:36 pm

We’ve posted our full analysis of the Census Bureau’s new data on health coverage, which show that the share and number of Americans with health insurance improved slightly last year.  (Because the results are for 2013, they don’t reflect the coverage gains in 2014 resulting from health reform’s major coverage provisions, which took effect on January 1 — namely, the Medicaid expansion and subsidized marketplace coverage.)

Census published data from both its Current Population Survey (CPS) and American Community Survey (ACS). … Read more

In Case You Missed It…

September 19, 2014 at 4:23 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the new Census Bureau data on poverty, income, and health coverage; the federal budget and taxes, housing, food assistance, and state budgets and taxes.

  • On Census Bureau data, we excerpted Robert Greenstein’s statement.  Danilo Trisi explained why the Census Bureau’s official poverty rate provides a real but incomplete picture of poverty and anti-poverty policies in the United States and noted that income inequality remained near a record high in 2013.  
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Debating Corporate “Inversions”

September 19, 2014 at 3:32 pm

At a Heritage Foundation panel discussion this week, CBPP Senior Tax Policy Analyst Chye-Ching Huang debunked myths surrounding the recent wave of corporate “inversions,” in which U.S.-based firms move their headquarters overseas for tax purposes, and explained why policymakers should take strong action against them, explaining:

People think that there is a simple story that is driving inversions . . . that there are companies that are changing their tax headquarters to escape the highest statutory rate in the OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development].  

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Child Poverty Remains High, But States Can Make a Difference

September 19, 2014 at 12:55 pm

Update, September 22:  We’ve corrected the map in this post. 

More than half of the states plus the District of Columbia had child poverty rates of 20 percent or higher last year (see map), new data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey show, and in some states — like New Mexico and Mississippi — poverty affected as many as one in three kids.  Such extensive child poverty unnecessarily damages the prospects of millions of children.

Relative to their better-off peers, poor children have poorer health, do less well in school, and complete fewer years of education.  … Read more

Why More Inequality Means Less State Revenue — And How States Can Respond

September 19, 2014 at 11:06 am

Growing income inequality in recent decades has slowed state tax collections, a new report from Standard & Poor’s finds, making it harder to fund public services ― like education ― that lay the groundwork for a strong future and help push back against rising inequality. States need to adapt their tax codes to take growing inequality into account.

Virtually all states collect more taxes (as a share of family income) from low- and moderate-income families than from high-income families.  So it makes sense that collections would slow when, as we’ve documented, the lion’s share of income growth goes to the richest families.… Read more

Poverty Above Pre-Recession Levels in 47 States, New Census Data Show

September 18, 2014 at 4:46 pm

Poverty remained above pre-recession levels last year in 47 states plus the District of Columbia, our analysis of Census data issued this morning shows (see chart).  In some states, the increase was substantial — in Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, and Nevada, poverty rates were four to five percentage points higher in 2013 than in 2007.  The stubbornness of high poverty rates in the wake of the Great Recession underscores the need for states to do more to help working families make ends meet.… Read more

Income Inequality Remains at Historic High, Census Data Show

September 18, 2014 at 2:43 pm

Income inequality remained near a record high in 2013 by several measures the Census Bureau released earlier this week, with data going back to 1967.

The principal Census summary measure of household income inequality, known as the “Gini coefficient,” was not statistically different from the record high in 2012.  And the share of national income that goes to the top fifth of households was 51.0 percent, not statistically different from its record high of 51.1 percent in 2011.  The share of the nation’s income going to the top 20 percent has been growing for decades, but it only recently surpassed 50 percent. … Read more

Coverage Gap Widening Between Medicaid Expansion States and Others

September 18, 2014 at 11:53 am

People in states that have adopted health reform’s Medicaid expansion had a lower uninsured rate in 2013 (before the expansion took effect) than people in non-expansion states — and non-expansion states are falling further behind in 2014, several recent government and independent surveys reveal.

Some 14.1 percent of the people in the 27 states (including Washington, D.C.) that have expanded Medicaid lacked health insurance in 2013, compared to 17.3 percent in the 24 non-expansion states, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (see chart).… Read more

House Republicans’ Wrong-Headed Approach to Tax Extenders

September 17, 2014 at 1:00 pm

House Republicans are putting before the House this week a campaign-oriented bill of wide-ranging measures that have previously passed the House, including repealing portions of the Affordable Care Act and scaling back Dodd-Frank regulations.  The bill, which won’t advance beyond the House due to obvious Senate and White House opposition, also includes business tax provisions that lawmakers will likely consider again during Congress’ post-election lame duck session this fall.  For that reason alone, the legislation warrants some attention.

The House bill would make permanent certain “tax extenders” — so named because Congress routinely extends them for a year or two at a time — as well as bonus depreciation, which lets businesses take larger upfront tax deductions for certain purchases, such as machinery and equipment, and that historically has been a temporary measure to help revive a weak economy. … Read more

Census Data Show Continued Wide Disparities in Health Coverage

September 17, 2014 at 11:46 am

Certain groups of Americans continue to be uninsured at particularly high rates, the new Census Bureau data show.  African Americans and Hispanics, residents of the South and West, adults under age 35, and households with incomes under $50,000 had uninsured rates in 2013 well above the national average of 13.8 percent (see chart).  Hispanics’ 24.3 percent uninsured rate, for example, was nearly twice the national average.

These estimates, from the Current Population Survey (CPS), are the best source for comparing coverage rates among population groups in a single year but can’t be compared to CPS estimates from previous years because of changes to the CPS questions for 2013. … Read more