Lasting School Cuts Endanger Critical Reforms

October 17, 2014 at 10:27 am

States have imposed large cuts in general education spending — as our new report details and I explained yesterday — with serious consequences for students, schools, and the economy.  Deep state funding cuts have led to job losses, slowing the economy’s recovery from the recession.  Such cuts also have counteracted and sometimes undermined important state education reform initiatives.

School districts began cutting teachers and other employees in mid-2008, when the first round of budget cuts began taking effect.  By 2012, local school districts had cut about 330,000 jobs.… Read more

Rental Assistance Kept Over 3 Million People Out of Poverty Last Year, New Census Data Show

October 16, 2014 at 4:33 pm

Rental assistance programs kept millions of people above the poverty line in 2013, according to CBPP’s analysis of new Census data.  The findings highlight the central role that rental assistance plays in helping low-income Americans keep a roof over their heads.

Our analysis using the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM), which accounts for non-cash benefits and taxes as well as cash income, shows that rental assistance kept 3.1 million people, including 1.0 million children, out of poverty last year (see chart).  … Read more

One Way to Help Poor Kids Do Better in School: Help Their Families Move to Better Neighborhoods

October 16, 2014 at 3:18 pm

Housing location makes a difference in low-income children’s short- and long-term success, as we detail in our new paper.  There’s growing evidence that violent, stressful, high-poverty neighborhoods can compromise children’s cognitive development, school performance, and health — and that low-poverty neighborhoods with high-quality schools improve low-income children’s school performance.

Many studies show strong links between neighborhood (and school) poverty and poor student academic performance.  A study led by Harvard University’s Robert Sampson showed, for example, that the verbal skills of children growing up in severely disadvantaged neighborhoods were lower — by an amount equivalent to one to two years of schooling —than those of children in better neighborhoods. … Read more

SNAP Kept Nearly 5 Million People out of Poverty Last Year, New Figures Show

October 16, 2014 at 1:39 pm

SNAP (formerly food stamps) kept 4.8 million people above the poverty line in 2013, including 2.1 million children, our analysis of Census data released today shows (see graph).  The figures are based on Census’ Supplemental Poverty Measure, which — unlike the official poverty measure — includes non-cash benefits (like SNAP) and taxes as well as cash income.

By providing low-income families with resources to buy food, SNAP not only reduces “food insecurity” (difficulty affording adequate food) but also frees up room in their very tight budgets to cover other necessities, such as rent and clothing.… Read more

Safety Net Cut Poverty Nearly in Half Last Year, New Census Data Show

October 16, 2014 at 12:25 pm

Safety net programs cut the poverty rate nearly in half in 2013, our analysis of Census data released today finds, lifting 39 million people — including more than 8 million children — out of poverty.  The data highlight the effectiveness of cash assistance such as Social Security, non-cash benefits such as rent subsidies and SNAP (formerly food stamps), and tax credits for working families like the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).  They also rebut claims, based on poverty statistics that omit non-cash and tax-based safety net programs, that these programs do little to reduce poverty.… Read more

K-12 Funding Remains Below Pre-Recession Levels in Most States

October 16, 2014 at 9:58 am

Most states continue to spend less — often far less — per student for kindergarten through 12th grade than they did seven years ago, our updated analysis of state general school funding shows.

Our review of state budgets finds that, after adjusting for inflation:

  • At least 30 states are providing less funding per student for the 2014-15 school year than they did before the recession hit (see chart).  Fourteen of these states have cut per-student funding by more than 10 percent. 
Read more

Rental Assistance Can Do More to Help Kids Live in Better Neighborhoods

October 15, 2014 at 12:13 pm

Where children grow up can influence their lifelong health and success, and improvements to federal rental assistance programs could substantially better their life outcomes, our new report explains.

Nearly 4 million children live in families that receive federal rental assistance.  But just 15 percent of the kids whose families receive rent subsidies through the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) three major rental assistance programs — the Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program, public housing, and Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance — live in high-opportunity neighborhoods with access to good schools, safe streets, and high rates of employment.  … Read more

Tomorrow’s Poverty Numbers Will Help Measure Strength of Safety Net

October 15, 2014 at 10:07 am

The Census Bureau will release poverty statistics tomorrow that will allow us to determine how well the safety net reduced poverty in 2013.  Our analysis of figures released last year showed that the safety net cut the poverty rate nearly in half in 2012, from 29.1 percent to 16.0 percent (see graph).

Tomorrow’s figures are based on Census’ Supplemental Poverty Measure, which includes not only cash income but also non-cash benefits such as food assistance and rental subsidies as well as tax-based assistance such as the Earned Income Tax Credit. … Read more

Data Desire Needn’t Be Barrier to Kids’ Meals

October 14, 2014 at 1:41 pm

The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) is now available nationwide, yet some districts are hesitant to implement it for fear of losing data from school meal applications.  But to get the data, we need not sacrifice school meals for kids.

Across the country, teachers and school nutrition administrators have praised CEP, which allows high-poverty schools to feed all students breakfast and lunch at no charge, for streamlining the school meal programs.  One of its key benefits is that participating schools don’t collect meal applications or make individual eligibility determinations, removing an administrative burden on school districts.  … Read more

In Case You Missed It . . .

October 10, 2014 at 1:58 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, the safety net, state budgets and taxes, and health reform.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr listed four things we would like to know about the forthcoming tax plan from Senators Mike Lee (R-UT) and Marco Rubio (R-FL). Chye-Ching Huang showed what congressional inaction on the Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit would cost working families.
  • On the safety net, we highlighted a TalkPoverty LIVE!
Read more

GAO: Administration Can Make Health Reform’s “Risk Corridor” Payments

October 10, 2014 at 1:16 pm

Health reform’s opponents are renewing efforts to kill its temporary “risk corridor” program, through which the federal government will help cover any higher-than-expected costs for insurers that offer plans in the new marketplaces while sharing in the savings if costs prove lower than expected.  But the Government Accountability Office (GAO) legal opinion on which they’re basing this latest attack says the opposite of what they claim.

Citing the GAO opinion, opponents claim that the Administration lacks the legal authority to provide risk corridor payments and that legislation is needed to prevent it from making unlawful payments. … Read more

Join Jared Today to Discuss Ways to Reduce Poverty

October 9, 2014 at 10:35 am

CBPP Senior Fellow Jared Bernstein will participate in a TalkPoverty LIVE! online panel discussion at 2:00 today on three policies to reduce poverty and increase economic security:

  • Raising the minimum wage and strengthening the Earned Income Tax Credit, or EITC;
  • Addressing erratic work schedules to make it possible to balance work and family;
  • Reforming the criminal justice system and re-entry policies so that criminal records do not resign people or their families to a life of poverty.

Other panelists include the Center for Law and Social Policy’s Jodie Levin-Epstein and the Southern Coalition for Social Justice’s Daryl Atkinson. … Read more