The Center's work on 'In Case You Missed It' Issues


In Case You Missed It . . .

December 19, 2014 at 11:05 am

Off the Charts will slow down for the next couple of weeks, but we’ll be back on our regular schedule when we return after New Year’s.  We wish you and your loved ones a happy holiday season.

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on health care, the safety net, and federal taxes.

  • On health care, Paul Van de Water explained that the emerging Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement needs changes to protect access to affordable drugs. Matt Broaddus reported continued gains in health coverage this year, especially among states that have adopted health reform’s Medicaid expansion. And Jesse Cross-Call noted Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam’s announcement of an expansion plan.
  • On the safety net, Zoë Neuberger warned that Congress’ decision to require WIC to add white potatoes to the list of foods it provides ignores the nutritional needs of low-income women and very young children.
  • On federal taxes, Chuck Marr highlighted a Washington Post editorial calling on policymakers to let the “bonus depreciation” tax break die next year.

This week, we updated our backgrounder on unemployment insurance.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week — Happy Holidays!


A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

As Congress cripples the IRS, tax rates are likely to rise
Washington Post
December 15, 2014

Crunch time again for health insurance sign-ups
Associated Press
December 14, 2014

In Mississippi, education money gap grows to $1.5B
Associated Press
December 13, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

 

In Case You Missed It . . .

December 12, 2014 at 2:25 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, inequality, health reform, and the safety net.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Robert Greenstein explained that IRS funding cuts for 2015 will likely lead to more tax-credit errors. Paul Van de Water noted a New York Times editorial on the flaws of using “dynamic scoring” in budget estimates.
  • On inequality, we highlighted our updated paper showing that income gaps have widened significantly since the 1970s.
  • On health reform, Jesse Cross-Call pointed to new figures showing that the law’s Medicaid expansion isn’t hurting state budgets. We explained that people who bought coverage last year through the federal marketplace should re-enroll to avoid paying more than they should for coverage.
  • On the safety net, Zoë Neuberger noted that nearly 14,000 high-poverty schools across the country have adopted community eligibility this year to serve meals to all students at no charge.

This week, we released a paper on why budget and tax plans shouldn’t use dynamic scoring. We updated our backgrounder on unemployment insurance, our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession, and our guide to historical trends in income inequality.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – Part of our Big-Picture Look at Inequality:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Housing vouchers key to a better life for Morris residents
Daily Record (NJ)
December 7, 2014

Keeping Score on the Budget
New York Times
December 6, 2014

The four-decade rise in state imprisonment, in one animated GIF
Washington Post
December 3, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

December 5, 2014 at 3:30 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on state budgets and taxes, the federal budget and taxes, the safety net, health reform, and jobs.

  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Mitchell mapped the large growth in state prison populations in recent decades. Nicholas Johnson presented a video highlighting the State Priorities Partnership, a network of 41 independent organizations working to improve state budget policies.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chye-Ching Huang pointed out that a reported congressional “tax extender” package included costly expansions of tax cuts.
  • On the safety net, Zoë Neuberger highlighted features of the school meal programs that make it easier for children whose families are going through especially hard times to obtain school meals. Kathy Ruffing explained why reapportioning payroll taxes between Social Security’s disability and retirement trust funds wouldn’t jeopardize retirees.
  • On health reform, Paul Van de Water listed six ways it helps middle-class Americans.
  • On jobs, Chad Stone illustrated the latest employment figures.

This week Chad Stone issued a statement on the November employment report.  We released papers on how policymakers often overstate marginal tax rates for lower-income workers and why boosting the Disability Insurance share of the payroll tax would not harm retirees.  We also revised our paper on how many veteran and armed-forces families receive working-family tax credits and updated our backgrounders on the Child Tax Credit, Earned Income Tax Credit, and unemployment insurance.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – the Growth in State Prison Populations

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

The four-decade rise in state imprisonment, in one animated GIF
Washington Post
December 3, 2014

N.J. incarceration rate has more than tripled since 1978 but down from peak
NJ.com
December 3, 2014

Paul Ryan hypocrisy watch: Episode infinity
Salon
December 3, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

November 26, 2014 at 1:03 pm

Off the Charts will take a break over the Thanksgiving weekend, but we’ll be back on our regular schedule on Monday.  To mark the Thanksgiving holiday, we ran a short series this week on some of the hardships that many American families face and the programs that help them make ends meet and improve their lives.

  • Douglas Rice explained that many American children won’t have a safe, stable home this holiday season, in part due to inadequate funding and significant cuts to federal rental assistance programs.
  • Brynne Keith-Jennings noted that the need for food assistance remains high and that SNAP (formerly food stamps) helps millions of families afford an adequate diet.
  • Stacy Dean explained why states and localities should redouble efforts to connect eligible people to safety-net programs like SNAP and Medicaid.

This week, we released a paper on why the emerging “tax extenders” package in Congress marks a significant step backward on several key issues facing the nation.  We also updated our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From Our Report on Tax Extenders

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently.  Here are some highlights:

White House threatens to veto tax deal
Politico
November 25, 2014

Obama Threatens To Veto Corporate Tax Cut Deal For Locking Out Middle Class
Huffington Post
November 25, 2014

The University of California just jacked up its tuition. Why your state could be next.
WonkBlog
November 21, 2014

In Case You Missed It…

November 21, 2014 at 2:53 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, the safety net, health care, and state budgets and taxes.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr listed four reasons why the House approach to “tax extenders” is flawed. Paul Van de Water explained why policymakers shouldn’t adopt “dynamic scoring” for tax and spending legislation.  We rounded up several new pieces on congressional negotiations over funding levels for this fiscal year.   And Arloc Sherman warned of the impact if Congress shortchanges Census funding.
  • On the safety net, Ife Floyd mapped state TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) programs around the country, which have weakened significantly over time.
  • On health care, January Angeles explained why enrollees in the federal marketplace should revisit it during open enrollment to ensure that they get the proper amount of help buying health coverage.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Leachman highlighted Kansas’ latest projections, which bring more bad news for those who hoped the state’s tax cuts would generate an economic surge.

This week, we released papers on why Congress should finish 2015 appropriations before adjourning, why the Senate approach to 2015 appropriations better protects domestic priorities, the large cuts in non-defense discretionary spending since 2011, why the President’s requested funding to respond to the Ebola outbreak is an appropriate use of emergency funding, and why consumers should return to the federal health marketplace to renew coverage rather than auto-renewing for 2015. We also updated our reports on why budget and tax plans should not rely on dynamic scoring and why the House efforts to make tax extenders permanent are ill-advised.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – A New Visual of State TANF Programs:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

The University of California just jacked up its tuition. Why your state could be next.
WonkBlog
November 21, 2014

Veterans in subsidized housing: one in two is elderly, one in five younger with disabilities
The Oregonian
November 18, 2014

Report: Millions hurt if family tax breaks expire
The Hill
November 12, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.