The Center's work on 'In Case You Missed It' Issues


In Case You Missed It…

October 24, 2014 at 2:31 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on housing, health care, state budgets and taxes, and a constitutional convention.

  • On housing, Barbara Sard explained how the Housing Choice Voucher program helps poor minority families raise children in low-poverty neighborhoods and avoid living in extreme-poverty neighborhoods.  She listed four ways that federal, state, and local agencies can help more families with vouchers live in better locations and described two programs that could advance this goal if sufficiently funded.  She also laid out two policy changes that could improve the lives of families living in public housing.  In addition, we highlighted her commentary on how policymakers can improve children’s chances of a better life.
  • On health care, Paul Van de Water rebutted a recent analysis by Senate Budget Committee Republican staff claiming that health reform would increase deficits.  He also explained why Medicare, Medicaid, and other health programs should be excluded from the investor-state dispute settlement provisions of pending trade agreements.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Mazerov debunked the myth that people who leave a state take their incomes with them, harming that state’s economy.
  • On a constitutional convention, we excerpted Robert Greenstein’s Washington Post commentary explaining why a convention could widen political divisions and jeopardize cherished rights and freedoms.

We also released a paper on why claims about the impact of interstate migration patterns on states with relatively high income taxes are deeply flawed.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Nation’s Wealthy Places Pour Private Money Into Public Schools, Study Finds
New York Times
October 21, 2014

A constitutional convention could be the single most dangerous way to ‘fix’ American government
Washington Post
October 21, 2014

Paying for schools
Hays Daily News
October 19, 2014

Give Wages Room to Grow
U.S. News & World Report
October 17, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  We’re still accepting internship applications for Spring 2015.  Apply today!

In Case You Missed It…

October 17, 2014 at 4:08 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on new Census data on poverty and the safety net, housing, state budgets and taxes, food assistance, health policy, and the economy.

  • On the new Census data, Danilo Trisi previewed the statistics and, after their release, explained that safety net programs cut the poverty rate nearly in half in 2013.  Brynne Keith-Jennings reported that SNAP (formerly food stamps) kept 4.8 million people, including 2.1 million children, out of poverty.  Will Fischer noted that rental assistance kept over 3 million people out of poverty.  Bryann DaSilva showed that the Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit together lifted 9.4 million people out of poverty.
  • On housing, Barbara Sard described how improvements to federal rental assistance programs could substantially better low-income children’s long-term health and success.  She also detailed how housing vouchers fall short of their potential to expand children’s access to good schools in safe neighborhoods.  Douglas Rice explained that helping families move to better neighborhoods is one way to help children do better in school.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Leachman highlighted our updated analysis showing that most states continue to spend less per K-12 student than before the recession.  He also pointed out that lasting cuts endanger critical education reforms.
  • On food assistance, Becca Segal underscored that schools adopting community eligibility, which allows high-poverty schools to feed all students breakfast and lunch at no charge, can continue to get needed income data even without school meal applications.
  • On health policy, Jesse Cross-Call explained why Indiana should revise its Medicaid expansion waiver proposal.
  • Onthe economy, Chad Stone excerpted his latest post for U.S. News’ Economic Intelligence blog on why the projected quickening of wage growth over the next few years won’t trigger an upward spiral of wages and prices.

We released reports on how improving federal rental assistance programs can help children’s short- and long-term success, how states’ current school funding compares to recent years, and why Indiana should significantly revise its Medicaid expansion waiver proposal.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Study: Michigan’s K-12 spending 9.5 percent below pre-recession levels
MLive (MI)
October 16, 2014

Report: Oklahoma again No. 1 in nation in student spending cuts
News OK
October 16, 2014

State Education Funding Lags Behind Pre-Recession Levels
US News & World Report
October 16, 2014

How small changes to federal housing policy could make a big difference for poor kids
Washington Post
October 15, 2014

The Global Economic Slowdown And What It Means For The U.S. Recovery
The Diane Rehm Show
October 14, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  We’re still accepting internship applications for Spring 2015.  Apply today!

In Case You Missed It . . .

October 10, 2014 at 1:58 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, the safety net, state budgets and taxes, and health reform.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr listed four things we would like to know about the forthcoming tax plan from Senators Mike Lee (R-UT) and Marco Rubio (R-FL). Chye-Ching Huang showed what congressional inaction on the Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit would cost working families.
  • On the safety net, we highlighted a TalkPoverty LIVE! online panel discussion where CBPP Senior Fellow Jared Bernstein discussed three policies to reduce poverty and increase economic security.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Elizabeth McNichol explained why recent changes in New Jersey’s budget practices have made a bad situation worse.
  • On health reform, Edwin Park pointed to a Government Accountability Office finding that the Administration has the authority to make health reform’s “risk corridor” payments.

We also updated our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Signs of hope for workers’ wages
CBS Moneywatch
October 9, 2014

Presidents and Jobs
The New York Times
October 5, 2014

Paul Ryan Calls for Tax Cut Mischief
US News & World Report
October 3, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram. We’re still accepting internship applications for Spring 2015. Apply today!

In Case You Missed It…

October 3, 2014 at 3:16 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, health care, food assistance, the safety net, and jobs.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chye-Ching Huang highlighted a recent must-read study that clarifies the relationship between tax cuts and growth. Brandon DeBot explained why tax incentives for retirement savings are ripe for reform. Chad Stone described how House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s call for “dynamic scoring” in tax reform is a gimmick that would only invite more mischief.
  • On health care, Judy Solomon listed three reasons why an Oklahoma judge’s decision on a key piece of the health reform law is wrong about health subsidies. Sarah Lueck noted that dire predictions about a sharp spike in premiums in the individual insurance market under health reform have failed to come true.
  • On food assistance, Brynne Keith-Jennings pointed to our updated quick guide to SNAP eligibility and benefits. Becca Segal noted Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s praise of community eligibility for providing breakfast and lunch to schoolchildren in high-poverty schools at no cost.
  • On the safety net, Stacy Dean explained why annually assessing the share of people eligible for both Medicaid and SNAP who actually receive both would better inform officials on how well we serve our poorest families and individuals.
  • On jobs, Chad Stone illustrated September’s jobs data, which show improvements over August’s figures though with substantial room for further gains.

This week, Chad Stone released a statement on September’s employment report. We also updated our guide to SNAP eligibility and benefit calculation rules and our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

Unemployment rate

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Paul Ryan Calls for Tax Cut Mischief
US News & World Report
October 3, 2014

Nearly 20 Years Later, a New Approach to Welfare
WNYC
October 2, 2014

African-Americans Less Ready to Retire
Seattle Medium
September 29, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram. We’re still accepting internship applications for Spring 2015. Apply today!

 

In Case You Missed It…

September 26, 2014 at 3:22 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the new Census data on poverty, inequality, and health coverage; the federal budget and taxes; state budgets and taxes; and housing.

  • On the new Census data, we listed five key takeaways from the data.  Arloc Sherman explained why the data strengthen the case for doing more to help low-income childless workers and pointed out that the decline in the official poverty rate follows a decade and a half of mostly rising or stagnant poverty rates.  Matt Broaddus highlighted our analysis of the health coverage data, which show a slight improvement.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr commended the Obama Administration’s important first step against corporate “inversions.”  Paul Van de Water explained why “fair-value accounting” would make federal loan and loan guarantee programs look more expensive than they really are.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Elizabeth McNichol noted that Kansas’ financial troubles highlight the need for well-designed state rainy day reserve funds.
  • On housing, Will Fischer explained that a House bill would raise rents on some of the nation’s poorest families while lowering rents for better-off households.

We released reports analyzing the new Census data and taking a closer look at the health coverage figures.  We also released an analysis of the Republican Study Committee’s health plan and updated our backgrounder on the number of weeks of unemployment compensation available.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Bad Policy Is Stalling Economic Recovery
US News and World Report
September 26, 2014

Census data on poverty show results of economic policy gone wrong
Los Angeles Times
September 20, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.