The Center's work on 'In Case You Missed It' Issues


In Case You Missed It…

November 21, 2014 at 2:53 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, the safety net, health care, and state budgets and taxes.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr listed four reasons why the House approach to “tax extenders” is flawed. Paul Van de Water explained why policymakers shouldn’t adopt “dynamic scoring” for tax and spending legislation.  We rounded up several new pieces on congressional negotiations over funding levels for this fiscal year.   And Arloc Sherman warned of the impact if Congress shortchanges Census funding.
  • On the safety net, Ife Floyd mapped state TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) programs around the country, which have weakened significantly over time.
  • On health care, January Angeles explained why enrollees in the federal marketplace should revisit it during open enrollment to ensure that they get the proper amount of help buying health coverage.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Leachman highlighted Kansas’ latest projections, which bring more bad news for those who hoped the state’s tax cuts would generate an economic surge.

This week, we released papers on why Congress should finish 2015 appropriations before adjourning, why the Senate approach to 2015 appropriations better protects domestic priorities, the large cuts in non-defense discretionary spending since 2011, why the President’s requested funding to respond to the Ebola outbreak is an appropriate use of emergency funding, and why consumers should return to the federal health marketplace to renew coverage rather than auto-renewing for 2015. We also updated our reports on why budget and tax plans should not rely on dynamic scoring and why the House efforts to make tax extenders permanent are ill-advised.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – A New Visual of State TANF Programs:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

The University of California just jacked up its tuition. Why your state could be next.
WonkBlog
November 21, 2014

Veterans in subsidized housing: one in two is elderly, one in five younger with disabilities
The Oregonian
November 18, 2014

Report: Millions hurt if family tax breaks expire
The Hill
November 12, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

November 14, 2014 at 3:55 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on health care, housing, the federal budget and taxes, and the safety net.

  • On health care, Edwin Park rebutted an attack on health reform’s “risk corridor” program. Matt Broaddus pointed to a new survey showing that low-income adults favor expanding Medicaid. Jesse Cross-Call described how states can help veterans by expanding Medicaid and explained that Congress can sustain gains in children’s health coverage by renewing the Children’s Health Insurance Program.
  • On housing, Will Fischer pointed out that rental assistance helps over 340,000 veterans afford housing and has contributed to recent progress in reducing homelessness among veterans. Douglas Rice detailed the impact of sequestration cuts on the number of low-income families with housing vouchers.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr explained that letting key provisions of the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit expire would push millions of people into poverty. Chye-Ching Huang clarified the differences between a repatriation tax holiday and a transition tax on offshore profits.
  • On the safety net, we summarized data showing that the safety net helps many low-income veterans and active-duty members of the military make ends meet.

This week, we released papers on how sequestration has affected the number of available housing vouchers, how SNAP (food stamps) helps struggling veterans and their families, and why letting key provisions of working-family tax credits expire would push millions into poverty. We also updated our report explaining why the “bonus depreciation” tax break should remain expired, our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession, and our paper on how rental assistance helps veterans afford homes.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From our special Veterans’ Day report:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Report: Millions hurt if family tax breaks expire
The Hill
November 12, 2014

When ‘Big Government’ Works
U.S. News & World Report
November 11, 2014

Congress should expand rental aid for veterans, budget group says
The Hill
November 10, 2014

This Boehner/McConnell Obamacare ‘fix’ could hurt millions of Americans
Los Angeles Times
November 7, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

November 7, 2014 at 3:51 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on housing, state budgets and taxes, health reform, and jobs.

  • On housing, Barbara Sard showed that low-income families’ need for housing vouchers far exceeds the supply. Douglas Rice explained why a careful review of the evidence shows that good neighborhoods can improve children’s well-being. Will Fischer called on Congress to expand a program that helps local housing agencies obtain private investment to revitalize public housing.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Leachman highlighted an interactive map on changes in state K-12 funding (see below) and posted a video on why education funding matters for the future of the U.S. economy. Michael Mitchell noted that a ballot initiative California voters approved Tuesday is a model for criminal justice reform.
  • On health reform, Paul Van de Water highlighted recent findings that refute scare talk about the medical device tax. He also explained why raising the cutoff for the employer mandate from 30 to 40 hours of work a week would be a step in the wrong direction.
  • On jobs, Chad Stone illustrated October’s jobs data, which show that the labor market is improving but wage growth continues to languish.

This week, we released a video on the impact of cuts in state K-12 funding.  Chad Stone released a statement on October’s employment report. We also updated our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

States spend too much of their budgets jailing people and not enough educating them
U.S. News & World Report
November 7, 2014

Federal housing voucher program serves a fraction of the need
Deseret News
Nov 6, 2014

States Are Prioritizing Prisons Over Education, Budgets Show
Huffington Post
October 30, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  We’re still accepting internship applications for Spring 2015.  Apply today!

In Case You Missed It…

October 31, 2014 at 3:55 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on state budgets and taxes, health care, the federal budget and taxes, and the safety net.

  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Leachman excerpted his recent debate with the Heritage Foundation’s Stephen Moore on Kansas’ radical tax cuts. Michael Mitchell explained why states should spend less on maintaining extremely high prison populations and more on schools.  He also analyzed the causes and costs of high incarceration rates and listed four ways that states can reduce incarceration rates.
  • On health care, Jesse Cross-Call showed that states that have expanded Medicaid as part of health care reform expect their share of Medicaid spending to grow more slowly this year than other states.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, David Reich explained why the Social Security Administration’s backlog of continuing disability reviews is rooted in program underfunding, not government incompetence.
  • On the safety net, Ife Floyd highlighted the continuing decline in the purchasing power of TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) cash benefits for the nation’s poorest families.

This week, we released papers on state criminal justice reforms and investments in education, the threat to TANF research funding, and states’ TANF cash benefit levels.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From Our Report on State Criminal Justice Reforms

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

States Are Prioritizing Prisons Over Education, Budgets Show
Huffington Post
October 30, 2014

Study argues Alabama’s incarceration rate — up 349 percent — crowding out other priorities
AL.com
October 28, 2014

States Slashing Education Spending
24/7 Wall Street
October 27, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  We’re still accepting internship applications for Spring 2015.  Apply today!

In Case You Missed It…

October 24, 2014 at 2:31 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on housing, health care, state budgets and taxes, and a constitutional convention.

  • On housing, Barbara Sard explained how the Housing Choice Voucher program helps poor minority families raise children in low-poverty neighborhoods and avoid living in extreme-poverty neighborhoods.  She listed four ways that federal, state, and local agencies can help more families with vouchers live in better locations and described two programs that could advance this goal if sufficiently funded.  She also laid out two policy changes that could improve the lives of families living in public housing.  In addition, we highlighted her commentary on how policymakers can improve children’s chances of a better life.
  • On health care, Paul Van de Water rebutted a recent analysis by Senate Budget Committee Republican staff claiming that health reform would increase deficits.  He also explained why Medicare, Medicaid, and other health programs should be excluded from the investor-state dispute settlement provisions of pending trade agreements.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Mazerov debunked the myth that people who leave a state take their incomes with them, harming that state’s economy.
  • On a constitutional convention, we excerpted Robert Greenstein’s Washington Post commentary explaining why a convention could widen political divisions and jeopardize cherished rights and freedoms.

We also released a paper on why claims about the impact of interstate migration patterns on states with relatively high income taxes are deeply flawed.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Nation’s Wealthy Places Pour Private Money Into Public Schools, Study Finds
New York Times
October 21, 2014

A constitutional convention could be the single most dangerous way to ‘fix’ American government
Washington Post
October 21, 2014

Paying for schools
Hays Daily News
October 19, 2014

Give Wages Room to Grow
U.S. News & World Report
October 17, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.  We’re still accepting internship applications for Spring 2015.  Apply today!