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In Case You Missed It…

February 27, 2015 at 3:24 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, food assistance, Disability Insurance, and state budgets.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Paul Van de Water explained some of the problems with “generational accounting.”  Chye-Ching Huang warned of the risks of using “dynamic scoring” for tax reform and other major legislation.
  • On food assistance, we excerpted Robert Greenstein’s congressional testimony on SNAP’s track record of eliminating severe hunger and malnutrition.  Zoë Neuberger highlighted our new report on how many schools have adopted the community eligibility option to reduce hunger.  Becca Segal called on community leaders, child advocates, and policymakers to spread the word about the benefits of community eligibility and mapped the participating schools.
  • On Disability Insurance, Kathy Ruffing explained why it’s an essential component of Social Security.
  • On state budgets, Michael Mitchell highlighted a report from the Brennan Center for Justice that finds growing incarceration contributed little to the sharp drop in crime in recent decades.

This week we released papers on how the Hatch-Upton proposal for the Children’s Health Insurance Program could weaken children’s health coverage and on the number of schools adopting community eligibility. We posted Robert Greenstein’s testimony on the importance of SNAP.  We updated our database on schools adopting community eligibility, our paper on why the excise tax on medical devices should not be repealed, and our backgrounder on unemployment insurance.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From Robert Greenstein’s testimony before the House Agriculture Committee:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Crying Crisis
US News & World Report
February 27, 2015

Tax Increases Much-Regretted Necessity for Republican Governors
Bloomberg
February 23, 2015

Walmart Changes the Debate on Minimum Wage
The Fiscal Times
February 20, 2015

Is Welfare Reform Causing Earlier Deaths?
The Nation
February 17, 2015

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It . . .

February 20, 2015 at 4:36 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on health policy, Social Security, and the federal budget.

  • On health policy, Edwin Park explained how policymakers could reduce overpayments to Medicare Advantage plans. Jesse Cross-Call noted that Wisconsin’s failure to adopt health reform’s Medicaid expansion is proving costly for the state.
  • On Social Security, Kathy Ruffing showed why the Netherlands is not a model for Disability Insurance reform, contrary to some claims.
  • On the federal budget, Richard Kogan set the record straight on the causes and meaning of the recent reestimate of student loan costs.

This week, we released a paper on sequestration and its impact on non-defense appropriations.  We also updated our papers on strengthening the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for childless workers, extending key EITC and Child Tax Credit provisions, and why states should adopt or expand their own EITCs, as well as our backgrounders on unemployment insurance and income inequality.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From Our Paper on the Impact of Sequestration:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Scott Walker Is One Of The Few Governors Still Cutting Higher-Ed Spending
FiveThirtyEight
February 17, 2015

Aid to Needy Often Excludes the Poorest in America
New York Times
February 16, 2015

Republicans Eye Changes to Food-Stamp Program
The Wall Street Journal
February 11, 2015

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

 

In Case You Missed It . . .

February 13, 2015 at 4:17 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on federal taxes, state taxes, health reform, Social Security, housing, and the safety net.

  • On federal taxes, Chuck Marr warned against making “tax extenders” permanent without offsetting the cost, and Brandon DeBot noted the House Ways and Means Committee’s approval of more extenders bills. Marr also pointed to a double standard in how lawmakers view tax compliance, depending on whether low-income working families or small businesses are at issue.
  • On state taxes, Michael Mazerov highlighted an effort to make state and local tax breaks for businesses more transparent.
  • On health reform, Tara Straw pointed to our new guide to help tax preparers understand the new tax-filing rules related to health reform. Jessica Schubel discussed how states can (and can’t) change the way they implement health reform through waivers.
  • On Social Security, Kathy Ruffing rebutted claims that Disability Insurance is in crisis. Paul Van de Water showed that approval rates for Disability Insurance benefits have fallen due to greater oversight.
  • On housing, Douglas Rice listed three takeaways from the President’s budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Barbara Sard described how federal rental assistance isn’t keeping up with need.
  • On the safety net, Zoë Neuberger explained that the WIC nutrition program works best under a science-based approach. Brynne Keith-Jennings showed how SNAP (food stamp) costs are falling.  Ife Floyd noted that funding for effective home visiting programs will soon expire.  

This week we updated our reports on the decline in SNAP costs and the cost of making tax extenders permanent.  We updated our backgrounders on unemployment insurance and state supermajority rules to raise revenues and our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From Our Report on Tax Extenders:


A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Another Day, Another House Bill That Proves Republicans Don’t Care About the Deficit
New Republic
February 12, 2015

This Chart: Social Security Disability ‘Crisis’ Might Already Be Over
Talking Points Memo
February 12, 2015

GOP governors want higher education cuts to recoup budget shortfalls
MSNBC
February 10, 2015

GOP health care plan emblematic of party’s dilemma
MSNBC
February 9, 2015

Republicans planning stealth attack on Social Security, Democrats fear
Washington Post
February 9, 2015

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

 

 

In Case You Missed It…

February 6, 2015 at 4:43 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on President Obama’s fiscal year 2016 budget, federal taxes, jobs, health reform, and the safety net.

  • On the President’s budget, we excerpted Robert Greenstein’s statement. David Reich described why the budget’s proposed sequestration relief makes sense over the short and long term.  Chuck Marr praised the budget’s restoration of a large share of the recent IRS funding cuts.  Chye-Ching Huang previewed the President’s tax proposals and analyzed his proposed transition tax on offshore profits.  Robert Greenstein argued that the President’s tax proposals are more progressive than some have interpreted them to be.  January Angeles pointed out that the budget’s proposal to reinstate a boost in Medicaid payments for primary care would improve access to care.  Shelby Gonzales noted proposals in the budget that would help enroll more eligible children and adults in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Barbara Sard described the budget’s funding boost for Housing Choice Vouchers to help low-income families afford housing.  Kathy Ruffing highlighted the budget’s proposals to preserve disability benefits while promoting thoughtful reforms.
  • On federal taxes, Chye-Ching Huang pointed out that the Paul-Boxer “repatriation tax holiday” would cost money so couldn’t finance highway construction.
  • On jobs, Chad Stone illustrated the January employment figures. Michael Leachman reported that states and localities cut 4,000 jobs in January.
  • On health reform, Jessica Schubel explained that Indiana’s Medicaid expansion waiver will require close watch to see whether it will meet its coverage goals and enrollees will get the care they need.
  • On the safety net, Ed Bolen detailed how Maine’s cut in SNAP benefits foreshadows cuts for low-income, unemployed adults in other states. Kathy Ruffing listed recent expert recommendations to make Social Security’s disability programs more efficient.

This week, Robert Greenstein released a statement on the President’s budget and Chad Stone released a statement on January’s jobs report. We published papers on the President’s proposed sequestration relief and the Affordable Care Act’s State Innovation Waivers.  We also updated our backgrounder on unemployment insurance and our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession. 

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From Our Report on Proposed Sequestration Relief:

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A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Why Obama wants to tax overseas corporate profits
CBS News
February 2, 2015

Obama’s Proposed Budget Seeks More for Education
The Wall Street Journal
February 2, 2015

Obamacare is costing way less than expected
Vox
February 2, 2015

Critics assail proposed tax holiday for roads
The Hill
January 30, 2015

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

January 30, 2015 at 4:17 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, health reform, and the safety net.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, in part five of our series on working-family tax credits, Chuck Marr pointed to our state-by-state fact sheets on how the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit reduce poverty, who benefits, and what states are doing to strengthen the credits.  He also explained that a proposed “repatriation tax holiday” costs money so couldn’t pay for highway construction (or anything else).  We marked EITC Awareness Day by pointing to resources to help eligible workers claim the credit.
  • On health reform, Judy Solomon described the diverse group of Americans who would lose coverage if health reform subsidies end in marketplace states. Paul Van de Water noted that projected federal health care spending has fallen even with health reform’s coverage expansions.
  • On the safety net, Chad Stone explained why the claim that unemployment insurance benefits kill jobs is unconvincing.  Arloc Sherman highlighted a new report listing policy changes that would reduce child poverty by 60 percent.

We updated our paper on how much a state EITC would cost and our backgrounders on state EITCs and unemployment insurance.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week – From Our Blog on Projected Federal Health Spending

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Critics assail proposed tax holiday for roads
The Hill
January 30, 2015

Nation’s per-pupil K-12 funding fell for second consecutive year in 2012
Washington Post
January 29, 2015

Are there more welfare recipients in the U.S. than full-time workers?
PolitiFact
January 28, 2015

Republican Governors Buck Party Line on Raising Taxes
New York Times
January 24, 2015

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

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