The Center's work on 'In Case You Missed It' Issues


In Case You Missed It…

September 26, 2014 at 3:22 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the new Census data on poverty, inequality, and health coverage; the federal budget and taxes; state budgets and taxes; and housing.

  • On the new Census data, we listed five key takeaways from the data.  Arloc Sherman explained why the data strengthen the case for doing more to help low-income childless workers and pointed out that the decline in the official poverty rate follows a decade and a half of mostly rising or stagnant poverty rates.  Matt Broaddus highlighted our analysis of the health coverage data, which show a slight improvement.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr commended the Obama Administration’s important first step against corporate “inversions.”  Paul Van de Water explained why “fair-value accounting” would make federal loan and loan guarantee programs look more expensive than they really are.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Elizabeth McNichol noted that Kansas’ financial troubles highlight the need for well-designed state rainy day reserve funds.
  • On housing, Will Fischer explained that a House bill would raise rents on some of the nation’s poorest families while lowering rents for better-off households.

We released reports analyzing the new Census data and taking a closer look at the health coverage figures.  We also released an analysis of the Republican Study Committee’s health plan and updated our backgrounder on the number of weeks of unemployment compensation available.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Bad Policy Is Stalling Economic Recovery
US News and World Report
September 26, 2014

Census data on poverty show results of economic policy gone wrong
Los Angeles Times
September 20, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

September 19, 2014 at 4:23 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the new Census Bureau data on poverty, income, and health coverage; the federal budget and taxes, housing, food assistance, and state budgets and taxes.

  • On Census Bureau data, we excerpted Robert Greenstein’s statement.  Danilo Trisi explained why the Census Bureau’s official poverty rate provides a real but incomplete picture of poverty and anti-poverty policies in the United States and noted that income inequality remained near a record high in 2013.  Matt Broaddus highlighted improvements in uninsured rates but found wide disparities in health coverage among certain groups of Americans.  He also noted that states that have expanded Medicaid had lower uninsured rates in 2013 (before the expansion took effect) than non-expansion states, which are falling further behind in 2014.  In addition, he analyzed new figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that show that the number of uninsured fell in the first quarter of 2014 by 3.8 million.  Paul Van de Water highlighted the rise in full-time work in the Census data, which undercuts claims that health reform is causing large increase in part-time employment.  Sharon Parrott noted that despite gains for families with children, poverty is still higher and incomes are still lower than before the recession.  Erica Williams pointed out that poverty remained above pre-recession levels for 47 states in 2013 and explained how states can reduce child poverty.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chye-Ching Huang debunked myths about corporate inversions on a Heritage Foundation panel.  Chuck Marr raised concern over a House Republican bill that would make permanent certain tax “extenders” and bonus depreciation.
  • On housing, Douglas Rice explained why policymakers should make a priority of fully restoring housing vouchers lost to 2013 sequestration budget cuts.
  • On food assistance, Brynne Keith-Jennings described a Brookings Institution report that found that the health of caregivers, access to stable housing, and child care can influence children’s food insecurity.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Elizabeth McNichol pointed to a new report from Standard & Poor’s that finds that growing income inequality in recent decades has slowed state tax collections.

Robert Greenstein issued a statement about the newly released Census Bureau data on poverty, income, and health coverage.  We posted the recording from our media briefing following the release of the Census Bureau’s new figures.  We also posted information about our SNAP Academy webinar series that seeks to educate states and local advocates, application assisters, and outreach workers with information on the program.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Is Obamacare causing a surge in part-time work?
CBS News
September 18, 2014 

Poverty rate posts 1st notable drop since ’06; Latinos show big strides
Los Angeles Times
September 16, 2014

U.S. Incomes End 6-Year Decline, Just Barely
Wall Street Journal
September 16, 2014

Incomes for Most Americans Won’t Budge 
The New York Times
September 16, 2014

Poverty in U.S. Declines for First Time Since Before Recession
Bloomberg News
September 16, 2014

Beacon Hill needs legislative fiscal office
Boston Globe
September 15, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

September 12, 2014 at 4:14 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on health care, poverty and income, the federal budget and taxes, welfare reform, and food assistance.

  • On health care, Matt Broaddus previewed the Census Bureau’s upcoming health insurance coverage estimates.  Edwin Park explained how a House bill would undo health reform protections and raise small business premiums.
  • On poverty and income, Arloc Sherman previewed the Census Bureau’s upcoming poverty and income figures.
  • On the federal budget and taxes, we reviewed how the federal budget process is supposed to work — and what happens when it doesn’t.
  • On welfare reform, LaDonna Pavetti critiqued a recent study on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program’s response to increased need during the Great Recession.
  • On food assistance, Zoë Neuberger highlighted how schools can do more to shield children from hunger.

Robert Greenstein issued a commentary on issues raised by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s “Opportunity Grant” proposal.  We issued papers on how a House bill would raise small business premiums and undercut health reform’s consumer protections, new research that shows the limits of risk adjustment in protecting traditional Medicare under premium support, and the flaws in a recent study on TANF’s response to increased need during the Great Recession.  We updated our explainer on the federal budget process.  Finally, ahead of the Census Bureau’s upcoming release of poverty, income, and health insurance data, we released papers on understanding next week’s figures on poverty and inequality and health insurance coverage.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

David Sarasohn: Expanded free lunch reduces hunger and stigma
The Oregonian (OR)
September 9, 2014

Local residents languish for years on HUD voucher waiting list
McPherson Sentinel (KS)
September 8, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

September 5, 2014 at 3:18 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on food assistance, health care, the safety net, and jobs.

  • On food assistance, Dottie Rosenbaum highlighted a Wall Street Journal article that echoes that SNAP (formerly food stamps) caseloads and spending continue to fall, as we’ve explained.  Brynne Keith-Jennings pointed to new “food insecurity” data that show the economic recovery has yet to reach many low-income families.
  • On health care, January Angeles highlighted a new study showing that expanding Medicaid coverage to pregnant women and children has beneficial long-term health outcomes. Jesse Cross-Call pointed to a new report documenting how hospitals in states that have expanded Medicaid are experiencing a drop in uninsured patients and higher-than-expected revenues.
  • On the safety net, Erica Williams explained how states can build a broader recovery by strengthening their earned income tax credits (EITC) and minimum wages at the same time. Chye-Ching Huang pointed to a new article from the University of California’s Hilary Hoynes on the EITC’s far-reaching benefits.
  • On jobs, Chad Stone illustrated this month’s disappointing jobs report — a sober reminder of how devastating the Great Recession and subsequent prolonged jobs slump have been for American workers.

Chad Stone issued a statement on the August jobs report. We updated our reports on why states should strengthen their EITCs and minimum wages at the same time and best practices for more trusted and reliable state revenue forecasting.  We also updated our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

Food Stamp Error Rate Declined as Rolls Grew
Stateline
September 4, 2014

Food-Stamp Use Starting to Fall
Wall Street Journal
September 1, 2014

The Number Of Homeless Veterans Really Is Falling
FiveThirtyEight
August 27, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

In Case You Missed It…

August 29, 2014 at 12:25 pm

This week on Off the Charts, we focused on the federal budget and taxes, state budgets and taxes, health care, food assistance, and the economy.

  • On the federal budget and taxes, Chuck Marr pointed to IRS Commissioner John Koskinen’s comments about the potential “catastrophic” effects of House-passed IRS funding cuts to taxpayer services. Will Fischer argued that while House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s endorsement of House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp’s plan to limit the mortgage interest deduction is moving in the right direction, greater changes are needed.
  • On state budgets and taxes, Michael Mazerov discussed further evidence that state income taxes have little to do with where people choose to live.
  • On health care, Jesse Cross-Call noted that Wisconsin’s and Wyoming’s budget reports show that their failure to adopt health reform’s Medicaid expansion is costing them millions of dollars in forgone budget savings.
  • On food assistance, Becca Segal urged eligible school districts to adopt community eligibility before the upcoming August 31 deadline.
  • On the economy, we highlighted key facts about the minimum wage.

We released an explainer on the minimum wage. We also updated our backgrounder on how many weeks of unemployment compensation are available from state to state and our chart book on the legacy of the Great Recession.

CBPP’s Chart of the Week:

A variety of news outlets featured CBPP’s work and experts recently. Here are some highlights:

The Number of Homeless Veterans Really Is Falling
FiveThirtyEight
August 27, 2014

The Myth of ‘Out of Control’ Disability Benefits
U.S. News & World Report
August 22, 2014

Don’t miss any of our posts, papers, or charts — follow us on Twitter and Instagram.